Power of Pride: A History, Our New Partners and An All-New Piece!

Moonglow was founded on the idea that every moment has a Moon; we’ve built a company that celebrates the moments that make life so valuable for all people. We must continue to speak up, take action, lend our support to those who are most marginalized, those who experience discrimination and abuse based on their real or perceived sexual orientation, gender identity, or expression. 

And this Pride Month we are proud to be announcing our partnership with OutRight Action International; an international human rights organization that is dedicated to improving the lives of LGBTIQ people worldwide. Founded in 1990, they endlessly work to inspire, research, train, defend and advocate for LGBTIQ peoples’ human rights. 

With our partnership also comes the exciting unveiling of our newest piece. Just landed: The Pride Necklace; we have brought together the Moon and the colors of the rainbow just in time for this month’s celebrations. A thin chain keeps the focus on the Moon pendant that is surrounded by the Pride flag for a subtle and beautiful piece. When you have a date ready you simply input it into our Moon phase calculator to see what the Moon looked like that day. Whether you’re choosing to celebrate a personal achievement, special moment, or day you’ll never forget, you’ll absolutely adore this necklace. 


For many of us, we look forward to the parades of Pride that take place each June. It was Bill Clinton in 1999 who first declared June “Gay & Lesbian Pride Month”. When Barack Obama was in office, during his entire term (2009-2016) he declared June to be LGBT Pride Month. And now in 2021, Joe Biden has declared June to LGBTQ+ Pride month. But why June? 

Unofficially before 1999, June was chosen in remembrance of the Stonewall Riots that served as a catalyst for the LGBTQ+ movement, not only in the United States but around the world. The Stonewall riots took place on June 28th, 1969 following a police raid of the Stonewall Inn, a gay club located in Greenwich Village, NYC. The 1960s were a terrible time for LGBTQ+ people in New York; constant penalization and police harassment meant that gay bars and clubs were places of refuge. 

But in the early hours of June 28th when police roughly hauled both employees and patrons alike from the bar, it sparked a riot from those in the vicinity, patrons and residents alike. For six days the uprising continued along Christopher Street, with more and more supporters arriving daily, information spreading, and a community coming together. It was the activism born on the very first night that carried through time becoming a force that though met with resistance, continues to last. 

The very first Gay Pride parade took place on the first anniversary of the Stonewall Riots on June 28th, 1970 where a few hundred people began their march up 6th Ave toward Central Park. As the march continued, more and more people began to join in. It has been documented that eventually thousands of people made up the procession and it stretched some 15 blocks. 

The difficult reality that we are reminded of each June, however, is that although we have made great strides there is still so much work to be done. Until all LGBTQ+ people can live freely without discrimination and abuse we will continue.